National Geographic

National Geographic

Photos by @michaelchristopherbrown | Palestinian children in Balata Refugee Camp, the largest refugee camp in the West Bank. Balata has a population of 30,000 residents in a .25-square-kilometer area, the majority of whom are under age 25. In 1950 the UN gave these refugees, originally from Jaffa, shelter in this tiny area near Nablus, which is now densely populated. The United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East, which last year was subject to hundreds of millions of dollars in budget cuts by the Trump administration, funds a school in the Balata camp with approximately 5,000 pupils. Other programs include the Yaffa Cultural Center, which operates a guesthouse, children’s theater and cinema, children’s library and media center, but with the budget cuts, it's seeking donors to fund the center. From 1980s through the early 2000s, Balata residents played a leading role in the first and second intifadas.
Photo by George Steinmetz @geosteinmetz | Sunrise in Pucusana, a vibrant artisanal fishing port on the Peruvian coast. To view more of our world from above, follow @geosteinmetz.
Photo by @ronan_donovan | A six-week-old wild arctic wolf pup peeks at a motion-triggered camera from behind her father’s leg, on the remote Canadian island known in the Inuktitut language as Umingmak Nuna, meaning "land of musk oxen.” In just a few weeks, this young pup will outgrow den life and start to follow the adults into the unknown. She will begin to learn about her vast home range and the sights and smells that will become her life for years to come. She will learn from her parents how to survive in this harsh environment, and eventually how to hunt the mighty musk oxen. To see more images of arctic wolves visit @ronan_donovan
Photo by Anastasia Taylor-Lind @anastasiatl | Anna Dedova, 75, is at the grave of her son, who accidentally killed himself last year when he opened a hand grenade found near his home in the village of Opytne. This visit is a rare chance for her: The graveyard is mined, and civilians are not allowed to enter. Opytne is situated close to the front line in what's called the "grey zone." During the active phase of the war, locals often had to bury their family members who died, or were killed by shelling, in their backyards. Later, they began cooperating with soldiers. A coffin would be placed in a military truck, and relatives were left to hope that they could find the grave later. This summer, for the first time in five years, local activists managed to organize a visit to the Opytne cemetery for those whose relatives are buried here. They secured a relatively safe path to the graves, but cemetery has become so overgrown that people struggled to find the crosses and gravestones marking their loved ones. They hurried to cut the grass and re-establish basic order—who knows when they will next have the chance to come back. Words by Alisa Sopova @sopova.alisa. #5Kfromthefrontline is an ongoing project about the everyday consequences of the war in eastern Ukraine.
Photo by Keith Ladzinski @ladzinski | With a long exposure, a quiver tree (kokerboom) stands tall under a sky of streaked stars. These trees are well suited to arid places with severe heat and low precipitation, due to an ability to store water within their trunks. They’re part of the aloe family, and have long been used for medicinal purposes. Photographed in the Kalahari Desert of South Africa. To see more photos of this beautiful part of the world please visit @ladzinski
Photo by Cristina Mittermeier @Mitty | Did you know that in Hawaiian culture when a baby is born the umbilical cord is buried in the sand along with a tree seedling This practice serves as a reminder of the connection that new person has not only to his or her parents but also to their ancestors and to the land. When a Hawaiian dies, the entire community, their ohana, paddles out and returns their ashes to the sea. This cultural connection to land and sea runs deep in the veins of native Hawaiians. The concept of Aloha ʻĀina, “love of the land,” is central in Hawaiian life and key to understanding their stewardship of the Earth. If you look at a mountain and all you see is a pile of rocks, you may have a hard time understanding why anyone would fight to protect it. For the Kānaki Ōiwi people, Mauna Kea is not just a mountain: it represents their ancestral ties to creation, a sacred site revered through their history and very much worthy of respect and protection. Follow me @Mitty for more stories that reflect upon the ways world cultures and nature are tied to one another. #kukiaimauna #wearemaunakea #culture #blackandwhitephotography
Photo by @jodicobbphoto | Heartbreaking floods in Venice yesterday, with 85% of the city under water up to six feet deep. Mayor Brugnaro said the city was "on its knees." I made this image of receding floodwaters in St. Mark's Square in 2008 during another record flood. #Venice #acquaalta
Photos by Stephen Alvarez @salvarezphoto | My first trip to Cedar Mesa was over 30 years ago. It was January, and I made the long drive to Utah from Tennessee, spending a frigid week in Grand Gulch, where I marveled at the canyon, the archaeology, and the artwork. Thirty years later this place has still captured my heart and imagination. It’s a privilege to be back here working on an @insidenatgeo grant about ancient artwork contained in eight western national monuments that have been studied for reduction by the Department of the Interior. Perhaps the greatest privilege is working with representatives of @protectbearsears in their ancestral home. For more images from this and other projects follow me @salvarezphoto and my nonprofit @ancientartarchive as we preserve humanity’s oldest stories.
Photo by @dina_litovsky | These are portraits of teen girls competing at the International Science and Engineering Fair (ISEF), the world’s most prestigious science fair, which took place in Arizona this year. Though young women have been a minority in STEM fields in the past, this year’s fair, with 1,842 finalists, was evenly split by gender, and three of the top four awards went to young women. This story on girls in science was shot for National Geographic’s November issue, "Women: A Century of Change." For more images follow me @dina_litovsky.
Photo by David Guttenfelder @dguttenfelder // Sponsored by @mazdausa #NatGeoMazdaContest // A Buddhist priest bows at Tokyo’s Koukokuji Temple, a sacred space for funeral remains that has more than 2,000 brightly colored, LED-lit Buddha figures. When photographing life in Tokyo, I am always inspired by Japan’s unique mix of beautiful and serene traditions with its innovative and frenetic modernity. // Enter the #NatGeoMazdaContest to win the opportunity to be one of National Geographic’s next great storytellers. When you are out with your camera, what remarkable or impactful moments have you captured We want to see what inspires you. Upload a gallery of 3-5 images to your Instagram account as one post, with the hashtag #NatGeoMazdaContest, tagging @natgeoyourshot. The contest, presented by @MazdaUSA, runs through November 18, 2019. Open to legal residents of the 50 U.S./D.C. only; 18+. For more information go to natgeo.com/mazdacontest.
Photo by @stevewinterphoto | Our new story, “The Tigers Next Door,” appears today in the December issue, produced with writer @sharonguynup. Few people realize that there are more tigers living in captivity in the United States than survive in the wild. These are some of the lucky few: Clay, Daniel, and Enzo are three of 39 tigers rescued from Oklahoma’s Greater Wynnewood Exotic Animal Park. These cats will live out their lives at the Wild Animal Sanctuary in Keenesburg, Colorado, with proper nutrition and vet care—and they will not be bred or commercially exploited. The sanctuary is a 10,473-acre nonprofit refuge for more than 500 rescued tigers, lions, bears, wolves, and other large carnivores. @wildanimalsanctuary @animalsanctuary #tiger
Photo by @davidalanharvey | Outer Banks, North Carolina: Evening at Avalon Pier was playful party wave magic as I photographed surfers until dark. The water is reflecting a sunset sky, and I popped in a strobe I've been using on my landscape images here. I had never met either surfer before, but when they saw me on the pier using a flash, one of them recognized me since he’s an aspiring photographer. Six degrees of separation max around here. #outerbanks #surfing
Photo by Jimmy Chin @jimmychin | Alpine dreamscape...Canadian style. Rock climbing Alpine climbing Mixed climbing It’s all climbing. For more images of alpine adventures around the world, follow @jimmychin
Photo by Lynsey Addario @lynseyaddario | Inbar Shimon with the Israel Border Police patrols a covered market in March 2019. The border police are a cross between police and military and service there counts toward obligatory military conscription in the Israel Defense Forces. The border police first incorporated women in 1995. Here they are patrolling in the volatile city of Hebron, near the Cave of the Patriarchs. This picture is an outtake from a story for National Geographic's November Women's Issue. To see more of my work, follow @lynseyaddario.
Photo by @stevewinterphoto | Over the past three decades, the oldest and thickest ice in the Arctic has declined by a stunning 95 percent, according to NOAA. The sea in the Arctic has changed dramatically, which impacts polar bears, walruses, and other Arctic creatures. If ice continues to melt, the planet will warm further as the dark ocean water absorbs large amounts of solar heating that used to be deflected by the bright white ice. We followed this polar bear as we sailed by in the Icebreaker "M/V Kinfish." @natgeoimagecollection
Photos and video by @babaktafreshi | A rare celestial sight beyond the visual limit of our eyes happened on November 11. The tiny disk of Mercury, the dot above the statue’s shoulder, traversed the sun's face during a five-hour transit. Mercury’s diameter is about the width of the continental U.S., roughly 40% of the Earth, and 285 times less than the sun's diameter. Swipe to see a time-lapse video and earlier view of the transit “first contact” through parting clouds in the city of Providence. The Independent Man bronze statue crowning the Rhode Island State House was framed in this super-telephoto capture, safely done by a solar filter on the lens. ⁣The next transit of Mercury happens in November 2032. #mercurytransit #astrophotography #providence #rhodeisland
Photo by @hammond_Robin | “What about growing older What are your thoughts on that” I asked Tom. A man of few words, he replied with a wry smile, “Hopefully. Yes.” I think he was being funny, but his sense of humour was so dry it was hard to tell. Dementia has taken much from Tom, but not his smile. In 2017 the condition affected 50 million people globally. It will increase to over 150 million people by 2050. These shocking statistics are our parents and grandparents. Very soon they may be you and me. With no cure in sight, we can’t just think about how we avoid dying from dementia. We have to consider how to live with it. You can see more stories from this series by following @onedayinmyworld
Photos by @carltonward | A large male panther emerges from a wildlife underpass that allows safe passage beneath State Road 80 near Labelle, Florida. The properties on either side of the road are private ranches that have been protected by perpetual conservation easements, funded by The Nature Conservancy (TNC) and other partners. There was already a bridge at this site for cars and trucks to cross over a canal. By adding ledges to the sides of the canal (where TNC Conservation Projects Manager Wendy Mathews walks; third photo) and high fencing on either side of the bridge, conservationists were able to encourage panthers to cross beneath the road rather than through traffic above. Vehicles kill nearly 30 Florida panthers on roads each year—the leading cause of death for the endangered puma. With the pictured segment of the statewide Florida Wildlife Corridor secure, panthers and other wildlife can now move safely from large public lands up to the southern banks of the Caloosahatchee River and the northern Everglades beyond. The Caloosahatchee had been a long-standing barrier to the northward movement of female panthers until late 2016, when the first female panthers were detected on the north side of the river in nearly 50 years. For Florida panthers to reach sustainable numbers, they need access to their historic territory in central and north Florida. Check the link in my bio for a new story connected to my #PathofthePanther project with @insidenatgeo. @PathofthePanther @FL_WildCorridor @NatureFlorida #Panther #FloridaWild #KeepFLWild
Photos by @brentstirton | // Supported by Nat Geo Society/Wyss Campaign for Nature committed to protecting 30% of the planet by 2030. // African Parks is a nonprofit conservation organization that takes on the rehabilitation and management of national parks, in partnership with governments and local communities. I photographed in five parks, and in the course of that whirlwind tour, I caught a glimpse of the extraordinary effort to conserve endangered species in some of the toughest places. This included black rhino care and translocation, rare Kordofan giraffes, West African lions and crocodiles, and the world’s largest elephant herd. African Parks currently manages 16 national parks and protected areas in 10 countries, covering almost 11 million hectares. That represents the largest and most diverse portfolio of parks under management on the African continent. They do this job with a skeleton crew, often living in spartan conditions for years at a time. It’s an incredible effort to ensure the survival of a global conservation heritage. Their goal to is have 20 parks under management by 2020. I’m very grateful to all the AP people who helped us tell their story. @africanparksnetwork #conservation #endangeredspecies #campaignfornature
Photo by Michael Yamashita @yamashitaphoto | Last prayers of the day at Yusof Ishak Mosque draw a crowd. Singapore’s diverse ethnic mix of peoples brings a wide variety of religions to this tiny country, with Islam being just one. #Singapore #Mosque #prayer
Photo by Erika Larsen @erikalarsen888 | Jacinda Ardern, photographed in Auckland, New Zealand, February 15, 2019. Jacinda Ardern is a politician serving as the 40th and current prime minister of New Zealand. In anticipation of the 100th anniversary of the 19th amendment, National Geographic is highlighting what it means to be female. As part of that coverage, we photographed luminaries from around the world. Check out the link in our bio to learn about Nat Geo’s groundbreaking new book that showcases an incredible group of history-making women. #NatGeoWomenofImpact
Photo by @mattiasklumofficial | Strong bonds! They are called vicious, false, and nasty, but all these are mostly human traits. Spotted hyenas are formidable, strong hunters, and efficient scavengers, and there are of course many sides to this incredible predator. I took this photograph of this cub greeting its mother in Mombo Camp in the Okavango Delta, Botswana. Even though hyenas look a lot like dogs, in fact they are more closely related to cats. Young hyenas are called cubs, and female hyenas are wonderful moms. They take excellent care of their babies, and most hyenas provide their cubs with milk for over one year. This is probably a necessity, as many kills are made far from the den, and hyenas do not bring back food and regurgitate it for their young. At about one year, cubs begin to follow their mothers on their hunting and scavenging forays. Until then, they are left behind at the den with a babysitting adult. Please go to @mattiasklumofficial to see images and films from our projects around the world! #spottedhyena #apexspecies #cub #mombo #carnivore @thephotosociety
Photo by @iantehphotography | When I took this image in 2007, I was struck by how this beautiful scene looked like a sunset over wintery trees at dusk. In fact, it was a chimney belching out flames from a nearby coal plant in Linfen, China. Back then, I was working on a series of images that explored the coal industry in China, which at the time was said to build an average of two coal power stations a week. Since then China has taken great strides to improve its environment. Today it invests more into alternative energy than any country in the world. However, a report published last year by the Global Environment Institute, a U.S.-based research group, found that the country is involved in building or planning over 100 coal-fired power plants across nations involved in its Belt and Road Initiative. #coal #globalwarming #fossilfuels
Photo by @noralorek | Four years ago the area containing the Bidibidi refugee settlement was a forest in northwestern Uganda. Now it’s a makeshift home for a quarter million refugees who fled the civil war in South Sudan. A year after fleeing her country, Poni Joselin had managed to save some money and started a business in Bidibidi, selling onions, soap, and small fish. Her two-year-old twins and five-year-old son join her every night.
Photo by @acacia.johnson | Light seeps through a crack in the roof of an ice cave in Alaska's Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. Known as "aufeis," this unique type of river ice— which can sometimes cover rivers year-round—is found in parts of Alaska, Russia, Mongolia, and Arctic Canada. I discovered this cave on an expedition to Alaska's Arctic with my father, and I was learning to use a 4x5 film camera. We later heard that Alaska's aufeis has dramatically decreased with warming temperatures in the past few decades—one of many changes I have witnessed in my home of Alaska during my lifetime. Follow me at @acacia.johnson for more stories from Alaska, the Arctic, and beyond. #alaska #aufeis #arcticnationalwildliferefuge
Photo by @KenGeiger | Look in the lower left corner of the first image—for scale, that's downtown Denver, Colorado. This thunderstorm was so massive I had to stitch several frames together to make this panorama. Colorado summer evening thunderstorms are one of the best free entertainments nature has to offer. #getoutside #infrared #blackandwhitephotography #thunderstorm To explore more images of the world follow @KenGeiger
Photo by Sara Hylton @sarahyltonphoto | Bushra Khaliq, one of the most inspiring women I’ve met, is pictured during an informational session on the importance of female political participation in a village outside of Lahore, Pakistan. Aside from being the executive director of a nonprofit working on female empowerment, Ms. Khaliq is a human rights defender and women’s rights activist. For more stories follow me @sarahyltonphoto #politicalparticipation #womensrights #Pakistan
Photo by Babak Tafreshi @BabakTafreshi | I felt an incredible connection to the history and culture of this far north land when the dazzling, dancing rays of aurora borealis appeared in a Viking village on September 27. This is where some of the earliest Nordic settlers lived in Iceland a thousand years ago. They were unaware that a nearby snow-capped mountain was (and remains) an active volcano. In 1104 a massive eruption ended life in the farming village. The replica turf houses were constructed near the original site, based on the archeological findings.⁣ Follow me @babaktafreshi for more visual stories under stars. #aurora #northernlights #vikings #nordic #twanight
Photo by Brian Skerry @brianskerry | Looking slightly wary of the photographer, a school of black margate fish drift in the water column within the Hol Chan Marine Reserve, in Belize. This protected area, located off Ambergris Caye, was created in 1987, and has allowed marine life and ecosystems to thrive. Researchers report that at least 30% of Earth’s oceans must be protected in order to have a healthy planet, yet today only about 3% has been conserved. The ocean is the greatest carbon sink on Earth, taking in carbon and giving back oxygen. But as fish are removed in alarming numbers, habitats are destroyed and increased amounts of carbon from fossil fuels are turning seawater acidic. As a result, the ocean loses its ability to function efficiently. Creating more marine protected areas is not only good for fish, but for all life on Earth. To learn more about ocean exploration follow @BrianSkerry. #belize #mesoamericanreef #marineprotectedareas
Photo by Ivan Kashinsky @ivankphoto | People cross themselves before a meal during an indigenous fiesta in the province of Huancané, near Lake Titicaca, Perú. This photo was part of book project in which Karla Gachet and I traveled from the Equator to the southern tip of South America.
Photo by Gabriele Galimberti @gabrielegalimbertiphoto | Orly, 6. Brownsville, Texas. Take a moment and think back to your childhood, the era in your life when the only thing you knew about a bill was that it was a bird’s equivalent of lips, and your day job was to construct fantastical worlds with your favorite toys. In my Toy Stories series, I explore the connection between children and their toys, getting an insight into their tiny worlds and taking you on a trip down memory lane. Toy Stories is the result of a 30-month trip, in which I visited more than 50 countries and took photographs of children and their favorite toys. I would often take part in a child’s games prior to arranging the toys for the photograph. Despite some differences, I found similarities among children living worlds apart. Even in different countries, some children’s toys had the same function; for example, protecting them from dangers and things they feared in the night. Toys haven’t changed all that much since I was a kid. I’d often find the kind of toys I used to have. It was nice to go back to my childhood somehow. | Follow me @gabrielegalimbertiphoto for more photos and stories #toys #play #kids #child #children
Photo by Charlie Hamilton James @chamiltonjames | // Supported by Nat Geo Society/Wyss Campaign for Nature committed to protecting 30% of the planet by 2030. // Spotted hyena pups emerge from their den at sunset on the plains of Kenya's Maasai Mara as their clan rests. The pups are just a few weeks old, but already venturing out of the den to mix with the older hyenas, establish bonds, and confirm hierarchy. Hyenas live in matriarchal clans, and even young pups can be dominant over adult members of the clan, especially male members, which tend to rank low in the pecking order. #campaignfornature
Photos by Renan Ozturk @renan_ozturk | Slices of life in Saadi, Nepal. Many thanks to the community for welcoming us into the village during #TheLastHoneyHunter assignment. Follow @renan_ozturk for more slices of life around the world.
Photo by Trevor Frost @tbfrost | To celebrate this Veterans Day I am sharing a story about a young veteran, Harry Turner, and an ocelot named Keanu. Keanu was destined for the illegal wildlife trade before being rescued by Samantha Zwicker and her Peruvian non-profit @hojanueva, who enlisted the help of Harry (pictured here) to reintroduce Keanu back into the wild. It is no exaggeration to say that while Harry has saved Keanu, Keanu has also saved Harry, who suffers from severe post traumatic stress disorder or PTSD from his tour in Afghanistan. For me, this story is a reminder that wild places and wildlife are places for healing not just veterans, but all of us. To see more photos of Keanu the ocelot, I'm @tbfrost.
Photo by William Albert Allard @williamalbertallard | Stan Kendall at the Miner's Club Bar, Mountain City, Nevada, 1979. A buckaroo crew and I went in one day to get supplies in the tiny hamlet of Mountain City, Nevada. Far from being a city, the community consisted then, as I recall, of a couple bars and a grocery store. It was late afternoon, and sunlight was blasting through the door, filling the room with red: Stan’s shirt, the curtains, the wainscoting on the bar, the barstool tops. It was as if the entire room was bleeding. Stan is kind of slumped there on the stool, a faraway look on his face. He had what I called that “leaving look.” And he did so the next day, packing up his bedroll and saddle, picking up his pay, and heading to another job on another ranch somewhere down the road. For more images of the American West and other assignments spanning a five-decade career #followme @williamalbertallard #nevada #red #bar #sunlight #cowboy
Photo by Stephen Wilkes @stephenwilkes | A lone sailboat glides through the fog on a turbulent day in Greenland. Long-term residents of Greenland are seeing firsthand the impacts of climate change, from a decrease in dogsledding, shorter ice-fishing seasons, and increased deaths from falling through thinning ice. The weather across the country, which used to be steady and predictable, is becoming increasingly volatile and threatening a way of life. To see more photos from my travels near and far, follow me @stephenwilkes. #StephenWilkes #Greenland #Iceberg #Melting #Climatechange
Photo by David Guttenfelder @dguttenfelder | A dining couple is painted on a wall next to a breakfast booth at a Route 66 roadside restaurant in Tucumcari, New Mexico. We’ve been crossing the country, making a classic U.S.-style road trip. But we’re also driving electric cars, visiting renewable energy projects, and meeting people with innovative ideas about energy to see where we are, where we need to be, and how to get to a renewable energy future. On assignment for @natgeo on a renewable energy #roadtripto2070
Photo by Ed Kashi @edkashi | An aerial view of Mount Pinatubo's crater and the surrounding terrain still shows the scars of eruption, including vast tracts of lahar lava flows that created an eerie lunar landscape. Philippines, 1999. #mtpinatubo #philippines #volcano #eruption #landscape
Photo by Becky Hale @beckythale | Marine geoarchaeologist Beverly Goodman didn’t blink when we asked her to get into a wet suit and stand in a shallow pool while I photographed her behind a sheet of falling water. Gabe Scarlett, our photo intern at the time, and Mark Thiessen, a fellow staff photographer, poured water while photo editor Julie Hau made sure I was sharp and photo editors Shweta Gulati and Eslah Attar made sure no one got electrocuted. Beverly is one of the amazing women I've had the privilege of photographing on assignment for National Geographic magazine.
Photo by Simon Norfolk @simonnorfolkstudio I Brazilian architect Oscar Niemeyer, who died in 2012, is considered one of the key figures in the development of modern architecture. He was best known for his design of civic buildings in Brasilia, a planned city that became Brazil's capital in 1960, as well as his collaboration with other architects on the headquarters of the United Nations in New York. This is the Palácio do Planalto, official workplace of the president of the Federative Republic of Brazil. Follow @simonnorfolkstudio for updates, outtakes, unpublished, and archive material. #OscarNiemeyer #Brasil #Brazil #Brasilia #architecture
Video by Paul Nicklen @paulnicklen | Emerging from the darkness below a fjord off the coast of northern Norway, a large male orca zeroes in on a herring that he stunned just minutes before with a slap of his powerful fluke. There were stunned herring everywhere, glittering like silver stars in the water around us. I gambled by parking myself next to one of them, preparing for the shot, and lucked out. You can see this male orca's incredible intelligence, his slow and deliberate approach toward the stunned herring. I watched with awe as he grasped the little fish, gingerly decapitated it, and then ate the body. Orcas are team players when it comes to hunting, corralling herring into balls and stunning them with their tails before they dive in to feast. It is incredible to watch, and it is such a privilege to be able to share these moments with all of you. Follow me @PaulNicklen for more videos and images of apex predators, like the orca, that keep our earth and ocean in balance. #OilFreeLofoten #Ocean #Norway
Photo by Karla Gachet @kchete77 | Yessenia Aguayo prepares for her quinceañera (15th birthday) at her grandparents house in the province of Los Rios, Ecuador, in 2008. For this celebration, her entire extended family pitched in and the whole town was invited. Yessy grew up in Hacienda La Mariana, a tightly knit community that survives off their land. Most of the people are blood related and inherited land from their parents. A quinceañera is a special celebration, a coming-of-age ritual. Back in the day, it used to be a way to show off your daughter to possible suitors. Things are starting to change for girls in the community. Yessy finished school and went on to college, and in this way she became a role model for many of her younger cousins. #mocache #montubiopride
Photo by Ira Block @irablockphoto | A full moon rises over the dunes of Erg Chebbi, near Merzouga, Morocco. Ergs are seas of dunes formed by wind-blown sand over time. Some of the dunes rise up to 150 meters (500 feet) from the surrounding desert. Besides visiting tourists, the area is also popular for sandboarding, a sport similar to snowboarding. #followme for more travel imagery @irablockphoto #travel #morocco #sanddunes #irablock
Photo by Michael Melford @michaelmelford | While driving like mad to get to my destination, an aurora lit up the sky! I had flown into Fairbanks, Alaska, on assignment to photograph the wild and scenic river Birch Creek, some two hours away. I was very lucky, as the northern lights went on all night long, allowing me to get a good shot. #Alaska #aurora #nightsky #wildandscenic
Photo by Katie Orlinsky @katieorlinsky | Vebjørn Aishana Reitan prepares to hunt caribou in Kaktovik, Alaska, an Iñupiat village on the coast of the Beaufort Sea located within the Arctic Wildlife Refuge. The Refuge is currently in danger of being opened up to gas and oil drilling. This not only threatens the 200,000 caribou that calve and raise their young there, but the people who rely on them. For Iñupiat and Gwich'in communities, subsistence hunting is not only a source of food, but a tradition that is crucial to their cultural, spiritual and everyday life.
Photo by Lucas Foglia @lucasfogliaphoto | June Rettinger de Arballo performs a Native American–inspired blessing ceremony at Enchantment Resort in Sedona, Arizona. De Arballo, whose mother is Mexican Apache, says tourists “want something authentic. They want something traditional from a culture that goes back centuries.”
Photo by Camilla Ferrari @camillaferrariphoto | In Shichahai, one of the most touristic areas of Beijing, China, the sun was about to set. Everything became silent. A woman came out of a public toilet–her expression was so delicate yet nostalgic–while a man, statuesque in his posture, stood behind a curtain at the end of a small street.
Photo by Michael Christopher Brown @michaelchristopherbrown | United States Special Operations soldiers stand above their base near the town of Obo, Central African Republic, in May 2014. Several days a week, pilots transported U.S. Special Forces and supplies from Uganda to South Sudan, Democratic Republic of the Congo, and the Central African Republic to support a coalition that included African militaries to help counter the Lord's Resistance Army (LRA), led by the fugitive Joseph Kony. Though Kony was not captured, the operation largely came to an end in 2017. For more follow @michaelchristopherbrown. #centralafricanrepublic #LRA #USSOF
Photo by @gerdludwig | A couple takes a selfie in front of the most famous mural on the Berlin Wall, called "The Kiss of Death" by artist Dmitri Vrubel, which depicts the late Soviet premier Leonid Brezhnev kissing his East German counterpart, Erich Honecker. November 9 marks the 30th anniversary of the fall of the 96-mile-long Berlin Wall, which physically divided East and West Berlin from 1969 to 1989. The East Side Gallery, a 1.3-kilometer-long section of wall that once circled West Berlin, is now an international memorial to freedom. The paintings document a time of change and express hopes for a better, more open future for the entire world. @natgeoimagecollection @thephotosociety #BerlinWall #Berlin #Germany
Video by Joel Sartore @joelsartore | The Sumatran rhinoceros has lived throughout Southeast Asia for millennia. But over the past century, its population has been nearly erased as a result of poaching and habitat loss. There are now thought to be fewer than 80 Sumatran rhinos left in the world, hanging on to existence in 10 fragmented subpopulations across two islands. This rhino is so rare that few people have ever seen one in the wild. Separated by mountainous terrain, Sumatran rhinos now struggle to find mates to propagate their next generation. If we don’t act now, the Sumatran rhino will very likely go extinct in our lifetime. #SaveTogether