National Geographic

National Geographic

Photo by @laurakmorton | Visitors to Mission Dolores Park in San Francisco, California, space themselves out with the aid of circles painted in the grass. The San Francisco Recreation and Parks Department painted the circles at Dolores and three other city parks ahead of the Memorial Day weekend to encourage social distancing during the COVID-19 pandemic. For more photographs of people, places, and culture in California and beyond follow me @laurakmorton.
Photo by @edkashi | Jingjing Sherman (left) is a general and bariatric surgeon at Englewood Health in Engelwood, New Jersey. She works with Dr. Morales-Ribeiro, who is also a bariatric surgeon, and together they volunteered their time to test patients at the hospital's drive-through test site during the height of the COVID-19 pandemic, which swept through New Jersey, ultimately killing more than 10,000 people. Sherman also worked in the ICU, treating COVID-19 patients during the height of the pandemic. Both were photographed at Englewood Hospital on May 14. #Covid19 #newjersey #pandemic #volunteering #jerseystrong
Photo by Pete McBride @pedromcbride | Border: The San Juan River snakes through the desert, separating Utah and Arizona, and historically the Navajo from the Ute. Today, it creates the northern border of the Navajo Reservation, which is reported to be facing the highest number of COVID-19 cases per capita in the U.S. This part of the world is near and dear to me, as its geology and painted desert are like nothing I’ve seen anywhere else. The Colorado Plateau and all its arid wonders create so many of the iconic landscapes we love, like the Grand Canyon and more. To learn how you can help the Navajo and other tribal communities, check out @grandcanyontrust or the link in my bio. I’ll soon be offering a flash photo sale to help, and my film #IntotheCanyon will screen online May 29-30 with Vancouver International Mountain Film Festival, with proceed portions going to help as well. Stay tuned. #support #navajo #covid19 #fineart #aerial
Photos by @carltonward | During my last assignment before the lockdown, I rode horseback alongside the cowboys of Buck Island Ranch, together with writer @douglas_main (3rd photo). We learned from sixth- and seventh-generation Florida ranchers Gene and Laurent Lollis about challenges ranchers face in Florida. Buck Island is a research ranch owned by @archboldstation, and Gene is the incoming president of @flcattlemen. Like many ranchers I meet, Gene is cautious but optimistic about the return of Florida panthers to the species’ historic range in the northern Everglades, where development pressure on remaining open land threatens panthers and ranchers alike. In the Greater Everglades ecosystem, one of the most important things we can do to save the Florida Wildlife Corridor and a path to recovery for the Florida panther is to give ranches and other working agricultural lands viable alternatives to development. Please follow @carltonward for more. @pathofthepanther @insidenatgeo @fl_wildcorridor @ilcp_photographers #ranch #Florida #KeepFLWild
Photo by @amytoensing | Walking and running in the park near our home has been essential during quarantine. Last week, I came across dancers in elegant costumes, floating among the trees and over the grassy knolls. They were from our local ballet company Syracuse City Ballet (@syracusecityballet), and were filming online educational content for kids in the time of COVID–another unexpected moment of beauty and hope in very strange times. #cityparks #timeofcovid #ballet
Photo by @amivitale | A young elephant calf seeks shelter under his mother in the Singita Grumeti Reserves, a conservatory adjacent to Serengeti National Park in Tanzania. Singita Grumeti Reserves are an integral part of the Serengeti-Mara ecosystem, home of the great migration. Young calves go under their mothers for a feeling of protection and comfort and, of course, to nurse. #singitagrumetifund @natgeoimagecollection #elephants #saveelephants #stoppoaching #tanzania
Photo by @lucalocatelliphoto | This futuristic vertical farming company is housed in a repurposed steel mill warehouse in one of New Jersey’s busiest industrial districts. The aim is to sustainably grow fresh vegetables in the shadow of New York City, while educating the community about nutrition. The reusable substrate on which seeds are laid is a patented cloth made from 100% recycled plastic bottles. Stacked in racks, the cloth is misted, which conserves water—it uses 95% less than what would be required in a field. Another goal for the facility is to reduce food waste by optimizing production based on demand and to eliminate extraneous parts of the distribution chain. It is estimated that almost 30% of the food production inside the U.S. is wasted—but technology could change that. As a photographer, my work revolves around this transition humanity is facing as we look for new ways to live in the future. This image was part of the March cover story on waste in National Geographic magazine. Please follow me @lucalocatelliphoto to find out more about it and discover other stories about the environment. #greenhouse #usa #future #environment #lucalocatelliphoto Check out Nat Geo's link in bio for more on this story.
Video by @bertiegregory | A pod of spinner dolphins rests in the shallow waters of Sataya Reef, in the Red Sea. These dolphins use the "flat" water created by the reef to rest and play during the day. Sleeping involves shutting down half the brain at a time. This allows them to breathe and look out for predators during naps. At night they head out to hunt in the open ocean, when their prey is nearer the surface. Follow @bertiegregory for more wildlife adventures. #redsea #dolphin #underwater #ocean
Photo by Muhammed Muheisen @mmuheisen | Anas, a 2.5-year-old Syrian refugee I photographed a couple of months ago, is held by his father, who wrapped him in his coat to shield him from the wind. Recently I spoke on the phone with a family living in this tented settlement in Jordan, and most of the conversation was about the coronavirus and how scared and vulnerable they and the people surrounding them feel. Be safe, be kind, stay home, and keep positive. We are all in this together. For more photos and videos of the refugee crisis, follow me @mmuheisen @mmuheisenpublic. For more on how to get involved, follow @everydayrefugees #muhammedmuheisen #everydayrefugees #COVID19 #Staysafe
Photo by Stephen Alvarez @salvarezphoto | The Oldham Theater in Winchester, Tennessee: I shot this photo on my way to get a COVID-19 test last week. Rural areas like this one, where I live, have largely been spared the ravages seen in northern Italy, Spain, or New York City. The pain and suffering of this pandemic are spread unequally. The marquee on the shuttered theater in Winchester reflects how strange the last 60-plus days have been: Life here does very much seem like a movie.
Photo by @lucasfogliaphoto | I took this photograph in rural Texas a few years ago. If there was a comic book superhero alive today, what would he or she say
Photo by @paoloverzone | Due to the pandemic, the Cannes Film Festival In France did not take place this May—for the first time in over 70 years. During last year's event, I had the pleasure to photograph director Quentin Tarantino, who was there presenting his latest movie, “Once Upon a Time in Hollywood.” The session lasted less than five minutes, and he was very focused. It was a true pleasure to take this portrait. Follow @paoloverzone for more photos and stories.
Photo by David Guttenfelder @dguttenfelder | A helicopter flies over a landscape of wind turbines in the Mojave Desert in Kern County, California, one of the country’s densest concentrations of renewable energy. The solar and wind industries have grown rapidly and now power millions of homes. Yet they still produce less than 10 percent of all electricity in the United States. Please have a look at “The Road to 2070” in the April 2020 issue of National Geographic, which marks the 50th anniversary of Earth Day. Check out Nat Geo's link in bio for more on this story.
Photo by @dina_litovsky | Since the beginning of the shelter-in-place order in New York City I have been walking the deserted night streets, photographing glimpses of life and light popping up in the otherwise dark metropolis. This was taken at Astor Place, in the East Village. For more images, follow me @dina_litovsky.
Photos by Michaela Skovranova @mishkusk | In early May I watched the moon rise above the Sydney Opera House. Days later it would form into a flower supermoon—the last supermoon of 2020. #Sydney #Australia #moon #supermoon #naturelovestories
Photos by @sarahyltonphoto | This time last year I joined a female-led team of scientists supported by @insidenatgeo who traveled along the Ganges River, from the Bay of Bengal to the Himalaya. The international team was trying to better understand how plastic moves through waterways and eventually into our oceans. In these images, children participate in a youth awareness and community clean-up session in Ayeshebag, and discarded plastic can be seen floating in a pond near Chandpur, both scenes in Bangladesh. As many of us across the globe shelter in place due to the COVID-19 pandemic, some of us have seen our priorities shift and have become more reliant on packaged items, delivery, and take-away food services. Environmentalists are concerned that single-use plastic may rise during the pandemic. While environmental concerns are not necessarily our top priority at the moment, we can still make an effort to limit our plastic usage and make smart choices for the future of our children and planet. For more stories follow me @sarahyltonphoto #planetorplastic #expeditionplastic #reduce #Ganges
Photo by George Steinmetz @geosteinmetz | A Tyson Foods beef slaughterhouse, Amarillo, Texas. The U.S. meat supply is currently threatened by the closure of slaughterhouses from COVID-19-related illness. For the past six years I’ve been documenting food production on all six arable continents. I’ve been allowed to take pictures inside only South American and Asian slaughterhouses, as getting into similar facilities in the U.S. and Europe has proved impossible. Although I’m not a vegetarian, I do feel we have a right to know where our food comes from, and how it is produced. If any major meat-packers are truly proud of their operations, I’m patiently waiting for an invitation! To see more about where our food comes from check out @FeedThePlanet and follow @geosteinmetz to explore more of our world from the air.
Photo by @lynseyaddario | Henry Robbins sprays a finish onto a coffin at Turner Manufacturing, where he and his colleagues are working six to seven days a week to deliver coffins around southwest England during the COVID-19 pandemic. The owner, Colin Turner, 58, said, “This is the busiest we have been in 20 years; every one of our customers are all busy, and the southwest isn’t big on the COVID scale.“ Turner has a four-week waiting time for coffins, making 150 a week—the maximum they are capable of making—as opposed to their normal 100 a week. The United Kingdom was one of the last in Europe to call for a nationwide lockdown to prevent large-scale deaths and illness from the coronavirus, and their current death toll is now on track to be one of the highest in Europe, with over 30,000 recorded deaths. To see more of my work, follow @lynseyaddario.
Photo by @tasneemalsultan | Children and families play in the streets of the old town in Al Ula in early February. This area in northwestern Saudi Arabia is set to become one of the country’s main tourist attractions, with archaeological sites that date back thousands of years scattered across 9,000 square miles (22,500 sq km)—about the size of New Jersey. #alula #saudiarabia
Photo by David Chancellor @chancellordavid | The underside of a bull elephant's ear shows the auricular veins—and evidence of a hypodermic needle puncture where blood samples were drawn under tranquilization, in Laikipia, Kenya. These samples may yet find cures for diseases afflicting both man and elephant. I can’t help but immediately see the tree of life here, and at the same time a map of Botswana’s Okavango Delta, where I’d been working for the last year, prior to the arrival of COVID-19 into our lives. The elephant is an extraordinarily sentient being—it’s not unsurprising that one can see visual representations of life itself within it. From a scientific point of view, the African elephant's ears are the largest of any animal, accounting for 20% of their overall surface area. They make extremely useful fans but also cool the elephant in cleverer ways: The elephant can control the volume of blood that flows through its ears via a network of vessels—if dilated, flow will increase, boosting heat loss. The ears work in a similar way to a car radiator, and when needed, they can pump 12 liters (about three gallons) of blood through each ear every minute. Follow me @chancellordavid @natgeo #elephant #kenya @spaceforgiants #covid19 #okavangodeltabotswana
Photo by @estherhorvath | This was taken during a storm in the central Arctic Ocean on the MOSAiC science expedition during the polar night, when the only light came from headlamps and from the icebreaker. Scientists Stefan Hendricks, Gunnar Spreen, and Oguz Demir return to the ship after finishing their sea ice and snow measurements. In the Arctic, temperatures have exceeded the average global warming by a factor of two to three, resulting in rapidly declining sea-ice extent and thickness. Unfortunately, scientific data from the central Arctic is still rare, especially during winter months. To help fill this gap, scientists from nearly 90 institutes and organizations in 20 countries joined the MOSAiC expedition, which embarked on September 20, 2019, and is ongoing for an entire year. I documented the first few months of the expedition, including 2.5 months in total darkness. Please follow @estherhorvath for polar climate stories and @mosaic_expedition for daily updates.
Photo by @katieorlinsky | Dogs in Sacks, 2015. During the Yukon Quest 1,000-mile sled dog race, dogs can be dropped from teams because they are tired, injured, or ill. These two were dropped at the checkpoint in Eagle, Alaska, a small community accessible only by plane. The dogs were placed in sacks, to keep them safe and calm, and removed from the course by plane. I wrote a “Through the Lens” essay for the March issue of @natgeo, telling the story behind this photo, and how I ended up flying in a plane full of dogs in the first place.
Photo by Pete McBride @pedromcbride | Light, water, and time. Three of my favorite elements in photography are also the key architects in creating this landscape. I spent over a year isolated in this place for @natgeo. At one point, I even spent eight days totally alone with only an audiobook (printed versions were too heavy), my thoughts, and no communication with the outside world. Now I sadly feel isolated from it and miss it, but I suspect this time machine of stone, and the wild critters inside, do not miss us. For more from this wild place, follow @pedromcbride. #grandcanyon #confluence #nature #ColoradoRiver #petemcbride
Video by @joelsartore I The Toad Mountain harlequin frog is an endangered species that calls the Darien region of eastern Panama home. It is primarily at risk from the spread of chytridiomycosis, a deadly fungal disease that has been killing amphibians through Central America and other parts of the world. Video taken @amphibianrescue, whose mission is to establish sustainable, captive assurance colonies of amphibian species that are in extreme danger of extinction throughout Panama. To learn more about this incredible species, follow me @joelsartore. #frog #amphibian #endangeredspecies #PhotoArk #savetogether
Photo by @andreabruce | Zarifa Ghafari, 28, is one of very few female mayors in Afghanistan. She governs in Wardak Province, a Taliban stronghold. To stay safe, she spends nights in Kabul—though even Kabul isn't safe. In March she was attacked by gunmen. She escaped without injuries. Take a look at the June 2020 issue and the story "Taking the Lead" that I photographed about the inspiring women—of Bolivia, New Zealand, Iraq, and Afghanistan—who have made huge gains in achieving political power but still face cultural resistance, and even violence, as their influence increases. Reporting by Rania Abouzeid. Follow me @andreabruce for more photos and stories. Check out Nat Geo's link in bio for more on this story.
Photo by @chien_chi_chang | Chinatown, New York, 1998. Humans need to hold hope in their hands. This man was willing to live in poverty, in hopes of prosperity—to sacrifice his immediate happiness in order to realize the dream of giving his children a better life. It has been two decades since I took this photo in New York's Chinatown, as part of an ongoing project about immigrants. A few years later, this man was able to bring his family to New York, and today they are living the American dream. He is now a grandfather! But is economic prosperity worth the social cost Perhaps the answers to such questions can be found in the lives of the people left behind in China, and in those of the second and third generations who are growing up in the United States. Look at them and listen to their voices. You may not understand their language, but you can feel their longing. #cccontheroad #MagnumPhotos
Photo by @paoloverzone | In Morocco, a team works on a Spinosaurus excavation, removing debris with large tools. I can still feel the heat of this particular day, when the temperature was 47 degrees Celsius (116 F). Spinosaurus was one of the largest predatory dinosaurs of all time. It is named for the elongated dorsal spines that supported an enormous “sail” of skin. In contrast to other dinosaurs–predominantly terrestrial–a long list of anatomical features indicates that Spinosaurus was adapted to live in freshwater, like crocodiles and hippopotamuses. Follow me @paoloverzone for more photos and stories. Check out Nat Geo's link in bio for more on this story.
Photo by @BrianSkerry and @nansenweber | A family of narwhals gathers on the surface in the waters of the Canadian high Arctic. The narwhal is called the unicorn whale due to its tusk, which is actually a canine tooth that protrudes from the animal’s lip. Male narwhal tusks can grow to lengths of nearly nine feet (three meters). On the right side of this photo, we see a narwhal calf riding on the back of its mom. Since access to this species has historically been limited due to the challenges of working in the places they live, much remains unknown about the intricacies of their lives. But based on what we do know, it seems clear that they have rich cultures and complex social relationships. Follow @BrianSkerry for more images of ocean wildlife. #narwhal #arctic #whales
Photo by @edkashi | Vicki Beckerman, a social worker who lives in West Orange, New Jersey, has been volunteering during the coronavirus pandemic by reaching out by phone to elderly people across America. She plans to continue for as long as it helps. I’ve spent the past two months documenting the story of people and businesses that have stepped up in my home state of New Jersey during the height of the crisis, which has killed more than 10,000 people in the state. This has been my way to engage with the current situation the only way I know how—through visual storytelling, and going out into the world to observe, learn, document, and share. Follow me @edkashi for more from #RisingToTheCall, highlighting stories within New Jersey. #wewillprevail #lifeduringcorona #newjersey #gardenstate
Photo by @michaelchristopherbrown | A young Liberian attempts to sell a royal antelope beside a highway outside the capital, Monrovia. It is known as the world’s smallest antelope, and hunting is a significant threat to its survival in Liberia as well as other West African countries, including Sierra Leone, Côte d'Ivoire, Ghana, and Guinea.
Photo by @enricsala | As the world works together to beat this coronavirus, we also need to be thinking, How can we reduce the risk of the next pandemic This virus is powerful proof that nature, our health, and our economies are connected.⁠ The good news is that our broken relationship with nature is something we can fix. We need to come back from this pandemic more resilient, and with the recognition that healthy ecosystems are critical for a healthy, stable, and prosperous human society. Taken in the Southern Line Islands, Kiribati.
Photo by @daviddoubilet | This small iceberg, called a bergy bit, provided a perfect resting place for a group of chinstrap and gentoo penguins near Danco Island, Antarctica. The penguins would take turns plunging into the sea, circling the ice multiple times like an underwater racetrack before launching themselves like mini-missiles back onto their private island to rest a moment and do it again. #Penguin #Play #Antarctica #ocean For more, follow @DavidDoubilet.
Photo by @babaktafreshi | With Earth's rotation, stars appear to rain down on the Volcán de Fuego (fire volcano), in Guatemala. The long exposure is the result of a timelapse sequence. On this November 2019 night, I recorded an average of 10 explosions per hour, with incandescent ejecta rising several hundred meters above the summit. Located only 11 miles (18k) from the World Heritage city of Antigua, it has been continuously active since a catastrophic eruption on June 3, 2018, which affected almost two million people, including hundreds of fatalities in the nearby villages. Many bodies are still missing. ⁣ ⁣According to the U.S. Geological Survey, on that day instead of slow-moving lava, Fuego erupted with a mix of ash, rock, and volcanic gases—a rapid pyroclastic flow that surprised the villagers who were used to frequent minor eruptions. The flows raced down at speeds as high as 450 miles an hour, engulfing whole villages at the bottom. A similar event was responsible for wiping out Pompeii, in Italy, about 2,000 years ago. ⁣ #twanight #volcano #guatemala #longexposure
Photo by @PaulNicklen | Under the waves off the coast of the Lofoten archipelago in Norway, you can see how the orca work together, how they communicate, how they corral and push herring up toward the surface so that they can feast. The humpbacks arrive and take mouthfuls of that herring too, and then you turn around, and there's a fin whale gliding through the water like an arrow, and he's come to feast as well. You realize how fragile and beautiful this place is. Norway's north coast is home to the world's largest deep-water coral reefs, the European mainland's biggest seabird colony, and the world's largest stock of cod, which migrates to the coast from Svalbard through the Barents Sea. There's so much life there, and all of it deserves our protection. Follow me @PaulNicklen to learn more about how we can use stunning visuals to inspire and challenge each other to make a difference in the world. #Orcas #ExtinctionEndsHere #OilFreeLofoten #TurningTheTide
Photo by @nicholesobecki | Around this time last year I was in the Democratic Republic of Congo covering the Ebola epidemic—the worst that country has faced, and the second worst outbreak in history. Here, Ebola survivor Sylvie Kyakinwa holds seven-month-old Kavira while the baby's mother watches just beyond the designated visitor line, in Butembo. Ebola survivors are no longer susceptible to the virus, so some have become caregivers for the littlest children. On a pragmatic level I learned important skills there, which have been useful to covering the coronavirus, including good equipment cleaning and hygiene practices. Perhaps most profoundly, I’ve seen how, in both situations, finding any sort of balance between staying safe and continuing to provide for your basic needs depends on people’s abilities to come together in new ways, and to adapt in a time of uncertainty. To see more of my work, please follow @nicholesobecki. Check out Nat Geo's link in bio for more on this story.
Photo by @williamodaniels | Some scientists warn there’s a small but real possibility that the COVID-19 virus could take refuge in a new animal host, and reintroduce it to humans in the future. Here, on Mount Morungole, in Uganda, Makerere University researcher Sadic Waswa and a student examine a bat they just caught. With a team from the Field Museum in Chicago, they are prospecting for the wild hosts of malaria, Zika, and other pathogens. The results may help in developing vaccines. In 2016 and 2017, I travelled to different locations in Africa, Asia, and Europe to work on the @natgeo story "Why Vaccines Matter." Follow me on @williamodaniels for more stories. Check out Nat Geo's link in bio for more on this story.
Photo by @stephenwilkes | I took this while on assignment in Churchill, Manitoba, where I was photographing polar bears. I witnessed an extraordinary full moonrise and moonset. I’ve never seen this type of distortion in a moonset—the shape took on the outline of a hot-air balloon or a mushroom cloud. This is called an omega moon, after the Greek letter. To see more photos from my travels near and far, follow me @stephenwilkes. #daytonight #churchill #moonrise #canada
Photo by Robbie Shone @shonephoto | Deep inside Lechuguilla, in Carlsbad Caverns National Park, there are many wondrous sights. These rare cave formations, known as mammillaries, were created underwater, at a time when the lake was much higher than it is today. The formations that look like lion tails (the white stalactites with orange bulbs) formed close to the water surface, with the white part above the water and the orange part just below the surface. This contrast between them can give you an idea of the level of the lake in the past.
Photo by Keith Ladzinski @ladzinski | A bolt of lighting fires down through dark skies at twilight over central Oklahoma. It's storm season in North America, a time where scenes like this are a common sight throughout Tornado Alley. Storm cells of this size can be quite destructive, but are part of an intricate cycle of life, bringing with them much needed water for flora and wind for pollination. They're both terrifying and beautiful to watch light up the skies.
Photo by Michael Yamashita @yamashitaphoto | Stone Perch: how does a stone end up balanced on top of a spire in Huangshan National Park The wonders of nature. #huangshan #anhui #china #worldheritage #nature
Photo by @enricsala | Ecosystems and the diverse species that live in them support life on Earth. They produce the oxygen we breathe, they filter the water that we drink, and they enrich our world with their presence. When ecosystems are threatened and species disappear, the planet is fundamentally and irreversibly changed. We can—and must—protect biodiversity. Our future depends upon it. #BiodiversityDay
Photos by @gabrielegalimbertiphoto | From my project In Her Kitchen: Grandmas are the best cooks! This is Normita, 65, from Oltepessi Kenya. Whenever I meet grandmas on my travels, I ask the same question: Can you make your best recipe for me This is mboga and ugali. Ingredients: Goat meat and a leg of goat, 50 gr cow’s fat, two tomatoes, 500 gr white corn flour, a plate of sukuma (a vegetable similar to spinach). Ugali is popular in Africa, and particularly this area of Kenya. it is part of the everyday meal, the base of almost any recipe. It is always combined with something else: meat, vegetables, fish, and so on… For the ugali, bring a bit less than a liter of water to boil with some salt. When it boils, add 500 gr of white corn flour, and stir continuously until it becomes a dense mixture. Cook for about 10 minutes, and then let it cool. For the meat and vegetables, cut the goat meat into small pieces (about 3 cm). Take the skin off the leg of the goat and strip the flesh from it. Put the meat in salted water. Melt the cow’s fat in a saucepan, and when it starts to fry, add two chopped tomatoes. When the tomatoes get mushy and create a sauce, add the chunks of meat and all the sukuma, cut into strips. Let everything cook for about 40 minutes. Add salt to taste. When the meat and vegetables are cooked, place them on a plate with the orgali. #food #kenya #africa
Photo by Cristina Mittermeier @Mitty | There is so much we are still learning about sound in the ocean, from the destructive impact of noise pollution to the ways that animals like whales use sound to communicate across vast distances. Scientists studying humpback whale songs recently discovered something fascinating: male humpbacks' songs evolve from season to season. Although we have no idea what these animals are saying to each other, I can say without a doubt that they are sharing something amazing. I've spent countless hours in the water with these magnificent animals, feeling their groaning chorus sweep over and through me. It is an experience I will cherish forever, and one I hope to put into words so that everyone can understand the importance of keeping the oceans healthy for generations to come. Follow me @Mitty to learn more from @SeaLegacy's #OceanSchool, an online program my team and I have created to support families while their children cannot go to school. #HumpbackWhale #Lofoten #WhaleSong #ScienceIsCool
Photo by @lynseyaddario | Undertaker Anthony James at Taunton Funeral Services, in Taunton, England, removes a man from a body bag as he prepares to dress him. The man died from COVID-19. Undertakers must decide whether they are willing to subject themselves to the exposure and danger involved in embalming and dressing those afflicted with the virus, as both activities allow for air to be released through the mouth and their orifices, which may contain the virus. The United Kingdom was one of the last in Europe to call for a nationwide lockdown to prevent large-scale deaths and illness from the coronavirus, and their current death toll is now on track to be one of the highest in Europe, with over 30,000 deaths. To see more of my work, follow @lynseyaddario.
Photo by @irablockphoto | Early morning begins the workday for camels and cameleers in Erg Chebbi, a complex of dunes formed by wind-blown sand in eastern Morocco, near the Algerian border. The dunes are located close to the town of Merzouga, a jumping-off point for tourists who overnight in the desert in luxury tent camps. This particular camel seems to be protesting getting up so early! #followme @irablockphoto for more images of the world. #camels #desert #morocco #irablock
Photo by @paoloverzone | In Barcelona, Spain, members of a swimming club are about to enjoy the first dip after almost two months of lockdown. Sporting activity is allowed now between 6 a.m. to 10 a.m. and 8 p.m. to 11 p.m. The city is slowly getting back to life, with all the precautions needed to protect the population. Follow @paoloverzone for more photos and stories.
Photo by @dina_litovsky | Los Angeles, the birthplace of skateboarding, has numerous skateparks throughout the city. This off-the-beaten-track basketball court at Pecan Recreation Center is a great spot for beginners. Though originally a heavily male sport, skateboarding has been attracting more girls. In the past decade, the number of full-time professional women skateboarders has doubled. The feature on the L.A. skateboarding scene is in the June issue. For more images, follow me @dina_litovsky. Check out Nat Geo's link in bio for more on this story.
Photo by @hannahreyesmorales | On her day off from the hospital, Allison, a nurse, visits her son Lucas, and they read together— through a glass door in the home she's temporarily isolated from. Globally women make up approximately 70% of health and social service workers. For moms at the front line, providing critical care amid the pandemic comes with the additional challenge of caregiving for their own families. I've often associated safety with holding our loved ones physically close, but in these times safety also means distance and space. For more stories on safer space making follow me @hannahreyesmorales. #Massachusetts #COVID19 @insidenatgeo
Photos by @carltonward | Seasons of the Everglades: Swipe to see the difference between the dry and wet seasons in this cypress swamp on a private cattle ranch next to Big Cypress National Preserve. The cypress tree on the left is estimated to be 500 years old. Right now we are at peak dry season. Summer rains will soon fill the swamps. Florida black bears use the swamps in both wet and dry times. In the Everglades, large, connected landscapes are as essential to the movement of animals as they are for the natural flow of water. Our @pathofthepanther project uses trail cameras to raise awareness for the additional land conservation needed to connect the statewide Florida Wildlife Corridor. The ranch in this photo represents the 40 percent of the wildlife corridor that is not yet protected and remains threatened by development. Please see @carltonward for more Everglades stories. Thank you by @insidenatgeo @fl_wildcorridor and @bergeronevergladesfoundation for supporting this work. #bear #everglades #ranch #water #swamp
Photos by @robertclarkphoto | Portraits of survivors who lived through the sieges of Leningrad and Stalingrad during WWII, part of the June issue cover story “The Last Voices of World War II.” An estimated 800,000 civilians died in the blockade of the Leningrad, with a total of 16,900,000 Soviet civilians dying in the war. Vera Nikitina (first) was a child when the blockade started. Nearly all her family was lost to the stranglehold that the Nazi forces had on the city. "I don't want to remember any of it, even to speak of it. I want to live the rest of my life in peace and see only the good in life." Boris Smirnov (second) says, "We were all full of Soviet patriotism." In October 1944, the 93-year-old's platoon was surrounded and callously gunned down. "I saw the laughing German soldiers ... we were rushing at them screaming; they were laughing and waving their hats. My friends were falling all around me." Maria Rokhlina (last), 95, was a Soviet combat medic who became trapped in a tractor factory during the siege of Stalingrad. She was part a group hugged each other for warmth. "We took an oath to never forget those we stood hugging." #SeigeOfLeningrad #Stalingrad #WWII #TheLastVoicesOfWWII #NatGeo Check out Nat Geo's link in bio for more on this story.